When Is Assisted Living Home a Better Option Than In-Home Care?

When Is Assisted Living Home a Better Option Than In-Home Care?

For many individuals today who strive to retain as much independence as possible while still enjoying a high quality of life, the decision is between assisted living and in-home care. Will we choose in-home care while we age in place, or will we relocate to an assisted living community capable of helping with our daily living needs?

The atmosphere and the level of care seniors experience during in-home care are considerably different than in an assisted living home. There are many factors involved with the decision, including financial ones. Answering the following three questions can help narrow down the decision:

  • How much help do I need with my daily living activities?
  • How much does each option cost (in-home and assisted living)?
  • How much money do I have in my budget to pay for the type of assistance I prefer?

Once you have the answers, you should thoroughly evaluate additional information about the level of care and services provided by each option. Keep reading to learn more about each option to determine the best choice to meet your needs.

What Is Assisted Living?

Assisted living homes, when done well, are designed for seniors who require various levels of medical and personal care (and is available 24/7 when needed). . Assisted living homes hope to preserve many parts of someone’s independent living for as long as possible.  As more help is needed, a caregiver is available to help with daily living activities and memory care.  Homes also help seniors connect with others and participate in activities like the larger facilities.

Seniors who opt for one of Vista Living Senior Care’s assisted living homes often need help with many aspects of daily living, such as:

  • Housekeeping and laundry
  • Medication management
  • Meal preparation
  • Daily living activities (bathing, toileting)
  • Mobile doctors and medical services
  • Social activities
  • Health and wellness programs and services
  • Round-the-clock security

Assisted living facilities differ in some of the amenities they offer, so it is best to check what your top choices provide. That way you can evaluate your options fairly and choose wisely.

Who Can Benefit From Assisted Living?

Seniors who know they require some extra help to complete everyday tasks but who still wish to maintain a level of independence will benefit the most from an assisted living home. There are tell-tale signs that it may be time to make the transition into assisted living.

1. Feeling isolated or lonely

Everyone feels lonely or isolated sometimes. But if this situation has turned into an overwhelming feeling of loneliness, it is a warning sign that a change is needed. Lack of community and a feeling of connection is linked to depression, which in turn can lead to chronic health conditions such as dementia and heart disease.

2. Declining health

Chronic conditions can become more prevalent as we age, requiring a more consistent level of care. With more than 70 million Americans aged 50 and older dealing with at least one chronic medical condition, the likelihood of needing additional care as they age increases. Seniors who have required frequent care for a chronic condition for several months are ideal candidates for the extra support and supervision provided by assisted living.

3. Mismanaging finances

A piling up of unpaid bills or other signs of financial distress can be early signs that a senior is struggling to manage on their own. Seniors who live alone also are more susceptible to financial scams, which can put their retirement and other savings at risk.

4. Hoarding

Hoarding is not exclusive to seniors, but it can pose unique risks and challenges if they are engaging in the practice. It is a sign that they may no longer be able to live on their own. Seniors who hoard are more likely to suffer from falls and other related injuries. Hoarding can make access to emergency personnel difficult or impossible.

5. Practicing poor hygiene

Maintaining good hygiene is important in preventing illness. As we age, the fear of falling in the bath can inhibit us from engaging in proper hygiene practices. The fear is not unfounded, with 80 percent of all falls happening in the bathroom. If you or your loved one is having difficulty with a personal care routine, assisted living can help.

What Is In-Home Care?

In-home care is exactly what it sounds like: personal aide, caregiver and/or nurse visit seniors in their homes to assist with everyday living essentials. The biggest benefit of in-home care is that it allows seniors to age in place in the comfort of their own homes.

Services included with in-home care vary by agency. Some of the more common features of in-home care are:

  • Assistance with personal hygiene (bathing, toileting)
  • Grocery shopping and meal preparation
  • Light housekeeping
  • Running errands
  • Transportation to appointments

In-home care services can be extremely limited and may not provide the same level of 24/7 care that’s available with assisted living homes. Those that do are quite expensive and may not fit into your monthly budget. Some insurance plans include coverage for long-term care, and there is always the option of buying long-term care insurance plans or insurance policies with riders for long-term care if you qualify.

Who Can Benefit From In-Home Care?

Seniors who are mostly able to manage their own daily living needs will benefit the most from receiving in-home care. It is extremely beneficial to those who wish to remain in familiar surroundings or who desire to be close to family and friends.

In-home care is ideal for those who have insurance that covers the costs of the service or those who have enough money budgeted for the expense associated with this level of care. The cost of in-home care averages around $25 per hour, according to the Administration on Aging, if the aid is hired through an agency. Independent caregivers typically charge $18-30 per hour.

Seniors who desire or require one-to-one attention and consistency in the caregiver who is providing the services would most benefit from in-home care.

How Much Help Do You Need?

When deciding between in-home care and assisted living, an important factor is the level of help needed by the person who will be using the services. There are several questions seniors (or their loved ones) can ask to determine the appropriate level of care.

1. Is it difficult for me to maintain my current home?

Keeping up with a house or apartment is tedious work, but it has the potential to become even more burdensome as you age. Large yards that require landscaping, flights of stairs that are becoming difficult to navigate, and extra rooms that are never used but still require tidying up are all reasons to consider downsizing from your current living quarters. If your current home has gotten to be too much responsibility, choosing to transition to assisted living is a great option.

2. Is it difficult for me to get to the places I need to go?

Transportation is one of the biggest driving factors in seniors choosing in-home care or assisted living. Homes can help senior’s families coordinate transportation to get to medical appointments, social engagements, or to run errands. If it is no longer safe for you to drive on your own and access to public transportation is limited where you live, it is time to consider in-home or assisted living.

3. Is it difficult for me to stay connected with others?

Social isolation is a very real concern as we age. If you no longer drive and if access to public transportation is limited, connecting with friends and family can be challenging. Many seniors find assisted living communities to be a great resource for social opportunities and fostering a sense of community.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Assisted Living and In-Home Care?

There are numerous pros of assisted living. The biggest benefit is the affordability factor for the 24/7 care available in assisted living homes. Round-the-clock care is possible with in-home care, but it is significantly more expensive.

Other pros include:

  • Care needs become a secondary thought, allowing family and friends to focus on spending quality time with their loved ones.
  • Seniors have many opportunities for socialization and activities with other residents.
  • Family members can stop worrying about hiring, scheduling, and managing caregivers and leave that hassle to the assisted living staff.
  • The level of care can be adjusted as needs change.
  • Consistency of care: a good assisted living home can keep their caregivers for long periods of time, and in-home care can be more of a revolving door of caregivers.

There are cons with assisted living as well. One-on-one care might not be immediately available at all times.  The quality of the care received is dependent on the staff. Some seniors do not enjoy living in an assisted living environment, so that can also be a disadvantage to this kind of setup.

The disadvantages of in-home care include the cost, which can be exorbitant if 24/7 care is required. In-home care also increases the chances a senior will feel isolated.

Need-to-Know Tips to Help You Make the Right Choice

Choosing between in-home care and assisted living is often a personal choice. When making the decision, it is important to listen to the wants and needs of the person who will be benefiting from the care. It is important to weigh all the factors. Some need-to-know tips to help you make the right choice:

  • Make sure the in-home care option (agency, individual) or assisted living facility meets your specific needs.
  • Compare costs for both: in-home care, especially if needed 24/7, is more expensive than assisted living.

The most important tip is to choose the option that makes the person using it the happiest. Everyone deserves to live out their golden years with dignity and respect and should have the final say in which option is chosen.

The Importance of Socialization

Social isolation is a real concern as we age. Connecting with others is a basic human desire, and when we are denied socialization, the results can be devastating. Groundbreaking research by the late John Cacioppo determined that mental anguish caused by chronic loneliness is real and can be quite devastating to mental and physical well-being.

In-home care is not the best option for seniors who want to increase their social opportunities. Assisted living homes are more equipped to help seniors plug in quickly to their new environment and to take full advantage of the amenities designed to promote socialization.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

Seniors with Alzheimer’s disease or in need of dementia care require extra assistance that may not be ideal for an in-home setting.

At Vista Living Senior Care, our staff is trained to provide 24/7 support services designed to help our Alzheimer’s and dementia care residents thrive. Residents enjoy daily activities and socialization opportunities that are therapeutic and uplifting. Family members can rest assured their loved ones will have the attention and support needed. Contact us to schedule a tour of our Alzheimer’s and dementia care communities and speak with a member of our team who can answer any questions.

Staff and Specialty Care

It is imperative to choose an assisted living community with certified staff members who are compassionate and available on-site for round-the-clock care. At Vista Living Senior Care, our staff is comprised of caring individuals who are dedicated to the health and well-being of our residents.

Our full-time nurse and staff goes the extra mile to ensure families are apprised of the level of care needed for their loved one and receive regular progress updates. Our caregivers are highly skilled and have extensive experience in supervisory, personal, and directed levels of care. The caregiver ratio is 1 for every 5 residents.

Help Finding a Senior Living Community at Vista Living

All of the senior living communities at Vista Living feature private suite bedrooms with bathrooms, a kitchen with island seating, and open common areas that encourage socialization. A beauty salon, rehabilitation and workout room, and patio equipped with a BBQ grill are additional amenities offered at Vista Living Senior Care.

We have several levels of care:

  • Assisted Living is for seniors who just need extra help with their daily activities.
  • Memory Care is ideal for our residents with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease and dementia-related conditions.
  • Dementia Care focuses on providing residents with additional assistance with everyday activities while preserving the independent-living model.
  • Alzheimer’s Care offers a high level of physical and emotional support for residents who require this additional assistance.

Seniors and their loved ones who are considering one of our communities at Vista Living Senior Care are encouraged to reach out to us today to schedule a free consultation with one of our team members. We can answer any questions you may have about our communities and help you choose the best option to suit your individual needs.

Want to check out your options from the comfort of your home? Our virtual tours feature 360-degree views of the facilities and amenities offered at each of our sites.

6 Common Myths About Aging and Exercise

6 Common Myths About Aging and Exercise

Benefits of Exercise for Older Adults

Exercising for seniors is more than just adding years to your life, it’s all about adding more life to your years. You’ll look great, feel great, be more energetic, and have a greater sense of overall well-being, no matter your age.

Did you know that exercise is the number one contributor to having a longer life? And it doesn’t matter whether you’ve just started exercising during your senior years.  To help you get started, it’s important to know about the physical and mental benefits of exercising for seniors.

Physical Benefits:

  • Improves balance, mobility, and flexibility. Strength, flexibility, and good posture are improved during exercise. Which greatly helps with coordination and balance – lowering the risk of falls and any fall-related injuries. Strength training is also known to prevent symptoms of various chronic illnesses, such as arthritis.
  • Reduces the impact of different chronic diseases and illnesses. Regular physical activity is proven to improve the body’s immune system and digestive functioning. It helps lower the risk of dementia, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, certain cancers, and heart disease. It also promotes better blood pressure and bone density.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Your body’s metabolism slows down as you age. Which is why maintaining a healthy weight is more difficult. Regular physical exercise helps boost metabolism and build muscle mass, which helps in burning more calories.

Mental Health Benefits:

  • Better brain health: While mentally stimulating activities such as Sudoku or word puzzles helps in keeping your brain running, exercise can do more wonders. It helps to prevent or slow down the progression of memory loss, dementia, and dementia by tapping into multitasking and creativity.
  • Good night’s sleep. Adults should be able to sleep for at least six hours every night. Exercise helps you be able to sleep quickly, sleep more deeply, and wake up energetic and ready to face the day.
  • Boosts selfconfidence and mood. When you exercise, your body releases endorphins – a hormone that can help lessen feelings of depression, anxiety, or sadness. Therefore, exercising is a huge stress reliever and helps you feel more confident.

Most Common Myths about Exercise and Aging

Myth 1: I have too many aches and pains in my body. I’m too weak.

  • Fact: Regular physical activity can actually help you manage aches and pains in your body. It also makes you stronger. Not only is there an improvement in strength, exercise also helps combat a decline in vitality that comes with age. The secret is to start slowly and gently.

Myth 2: It doesn’t matter if I exercise – I’m getting old anyway.  

  • Fact: Exercising promotes independence and makes you look and feel younger. It also reduces the chances of developing various health conditions, such as Alzheimer’s and dementia, diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease, obesity, and high blood pressure.

Myth 3: It’s so frustrating. I’ll never be as agile as I once was.

  • Fact: Your body changes as you age. Your hormones, bone density, metabolism, and muscle mass may change. That said, strength and performance level may inevitably decline as you get older. However, it doesn’t mean that you can no longer benefit from health improvements the sense of accomplishment you get after exercising. It’s best to start slow and to tailor your exercises to your lifestyle goals that are age-appropriate. Always remember that being sedentary can do more harm than good.

Myth 4: Exercising increases the risk of falling.

  • Fact: As a matter of fact, exercising regularly can promote muscle building, improve strength and stamina, and prevent the loss of bone mass. As a result, your balance will improve, reducing the risk of falling. Every senior should incorporate balance exercises into their exercise regimen.

Myth 5: I won’t be able to exercise since I’m disabled.

  • Fact: People with disabilities face certain challenges when it comes to physical activity. However, there are many exercises that tailor to their needs. They can lift weights, stretch, do chair aerobics, chair yoga, and chair Tai Chi to help improve range of motion, muscle tone, and flexibility, as well as their cardiovascular health. Many gyms or swimming pools may offer classes and other adaptive programs to people in wheelchairs.

Myth 6: I’m too old.

  • Fact: You will never be too old to exercise. It will never be too late to get moving and improve your overall well-being. As a matter of fact, people who become active later in life reap more physical and mental benefits as opposed to younger people. If you haven’t tried exercising before or if you haven’t exercised in a long time, it’s best to start with gentle and simple exercises and build it up from there.

Exercising is for everyone. However, before you begin any form of exercise, be sure to consult your doctor or your healthcare team. They will most likely refer you to a reputable personal trainer or they may prescribe you with the right exercises for you.

How to Overcome Obstacles that Prevent You from Being Active

Did you notice your elderly loved one becoming more sedentary as they age? Many seniors tend to slow down as they grow older due to many different reasons, such as feelings of pain, weight changes, health problems, or worries about falling. Or maybe your elderly loved one thinks that exercising for seniors isn’t for them.

With everything that’s going on with our daily lives, it may be hard to maintain a regular exercise routine that you can stick to. And it won’t get easier as you get older due to body pain, health problems, and concerns regarding falling or other injuries.

If you think you’re too old to exercise or if you haven’t exercised before, you may feel that these are legitimate reasons to slow down and give up exercising altogether. However, these are exactly the reasons why you should get moving.

Keep in mind that whether you’re 9 or 90, it’s never too late to keep your body moving.

At Vista Living Senior Care and our team helps seniors improve the quality of their life by making our purpose built 10 resident Luxury Senior Care Homes in the Phoenix Arcadia area something special.  Sit and Be FIT exercises start our days and attendance is impressive with no one showing up late.

Vista Living Exercise Program

Seniors exercising at Vista Living Senior Care

We urge you to consider Vista Living Senior Care for your family, please schedule a tour, we know we have something special. Let us show you.  For more information please call Vista Living Senior Care at 480-456-1919 or Visit VistaLiving.net.

Seniors vulnerable to accidents in the home

Seniors vulnerable to accidents in the home

Accidents in the home, time for a safety assessment

During these upcoming holidays we have the opportunity to visit with family and friends we may not have seen in awhile.  If that lists includes seniors, it’s a great time to start a discussion of senior care.  Make sure a visit to their homes includes a safety assessment to find hazards and avoid those painful senior accidents.

Recent surveys have shown over 65 percent of seniors’ homes have potential safety hazards, and almost half of accidents in the home are avoidable. The survey also found that 85 percent of seniors do not take steps to get rid of home hazards as they get older.

Periodic safety inspections is a must to alleviate hazards and senior accidents

Several years ago I was attempting to help a family move their mother out of her home and into the safe protected environment of our senior community. Her daughter brought Carol for a visit and she loved it there, made a couple friends and was looking forward to moving in. The next day I received the call from Carol’s daughter, Mom fell last night at home and won’t be able to move the next weekend as planned.

Several weeks later, Carol’s daughter called me to let me know that Carol was coming home and asked if I could meet the family there the next afternoon. It sounded like Carol was starting to feel better and was thinking about delaying the transition and wanted to stay in her home a bit longer.

Immediately upon arrival, I started to point out items to the family that were accidents waiting to happen. Each electrical extension cord is a trap, the throw rugs must go (hate them), and do we need to even talk about the stairs. Very sincere and nice family, it was decided Carol was moving tomorrow. While saying goodbye to all, I was at the front door and then we all heard a noise and then the scream. Yep, Carol fell again; I hate those throw rugs. Carol broke her hip and never was not able to move in.

Millions of seniors end up in the hospital every year in the U.S. because of falls and other accidents — roughly a third of all hospital visits for people over age 65. Many of these injuries happen at home and could have been prevented with some careful planning.

Common senior accident issues include tripping hazards, like throw rugs, storage that’s out of reach or a lack of grab bars to hold onto in the bathroom. Older people are not as steady on their feet, and could benefit from these small improvements in the home.

If you see a step stool in the house be concerned, very concerned.

But some of the senior accident hazards are a little less obvious. Clutter in general can be a problem for seniors, especially in hallways that make it hard to maneuver around with a walker.  Pets have been know to bring down a senior by accident.

The problem is twofold: seniors are more susceptible to falling as they age, and they are more likely to be injured when they do fall. Many seniors may suffer from impaired vision, muscle atrophy, cognitive impairment, and balance issues, making it harder to maneuver around without falling. Seniors who have diabetes, arthritis or had a stroke are also at increased risk.

The family needs to discuss the current medications being taken – they also play a role! And seniors need to be aware that what they’re taking might make them unsteady on their feet. Multiple medications, specifically combinations of drugs, can cause seniors to experience dizziness and other side-effects that can cause a fall.

Many safety suggestions rely on family members to help make the house a safe place. It just makes it so much easier to get things done when family members are talking about solutions and getting a plan together to prevent senior accidents.

Vista Living Senior Care and our team helps seniors improve the quality of their life by making our purpose built 10 resident Luxury Senior Care Homes in the Phoenix Arcadia area something special.

We urge you to consider Vista Living Senior Care for your family, please schedule a tour, we know we have something special. Let us show you.

For more information please call Vista Living Senior Care at 480-456-1919 or Visit VistaLiving.net.

Medical Care for Senior Citizens

Medical Care for Senior Citizens

I remember being invited to visit with Maria and her visiting son Tony who was in town for their annual check in. He and the family lived back East in New York and were very worried that something could happen at anytime and they would not be able to help Maria.

The family was looking for a safe, protected environment for her; she was not sure. While we looked around her home, we noticed all the usual suspects of safety concerns including extension cords, throw rugs and steps. Maria looked very sedentary for someone in her 80’s but she did love to talk. Tony mentioned how quickly her health turned poorer this last year.

Asked about friends, all gone. Asked about physical activities, none. Asked about diet, frozen and fast food. Asked Tony to check out the fridge, some water and soda, the freezer had some frozen dinners and the rest was full of ice cream, vanilla ice cream Maria’s favorite.

The families next visit to Maria was at her new assisted living home. They could not believe the difference a healthier diet, social interaction and some activities can do. Maria has become more active and is a social butterfly, after all she does love to talk.

Tony and his family were lucky they saw the difference and needs Maria had and were able to do something before things got worse.  With the holidays coming soon, many families will be visiting their senior loved ones for their annual or semi annual visits especially if they live out of the area.  Here are some things to look out for and some great tips.

Anticipate and Respond to Elderly Emergencies

If you have a loved one who is a senior citizen, it’s natural to expect them to require additional medical help as time goes by. The senior population in the United States is living longer, thanks to advances in medical science, and this means that new challenges are facing elder care. Thankfully, keeping your elderly loved one safe and healthy is manageable, when you follow common sense and a few practical tips.

Stay Informed
One of the most important things you can do to help your elderly loved one with their health care is to be informed.
If possible:
• Go to doctor’s appointments with them
• Know status of your loved one’s health
• Stay alert as to whether they are suffering from memory problems
• Ask when was the last time they had theirs eyes or ears checked
• Keep note of their prescription drugs and:
• Any warnings or adverse interactions associated with them.

Check in Often
If your elderly loved one lives on his or her own, check in often and regularly. What could have been a simple fix may turn into a serious medical emergency:

Seniors who live alone may suffer from accidents, such as:
• Slips and falls
• Medication issues
• Dehydration issues
• Suffer from depression
• Create a phone call or visitation schedule
• If you don’t hear from them as planned, follow up immediately to see if they need emergency care.
• Every visit, look for signs of disorder, accidents waiting to happen
• Remove all extension cords when not needed
• Get rid of all throw rugs!!
• Review easy access to storage
• Check the fridge, is their diet balanced

Consider Professional Senior Care
If you are having difficulty balancing your life and elder care or aren’t able to live with or near your loved one, but you know that he or she needs additional help you cannot provide, consider elder care solutions such as in-home care or assisted living.

When considering these options, you will have to make sure that your loved one is on board and understands that the purpose behind hiring professional care is to ensure the senior’s safety and avoid medical emergencies.

If you do face a medical emergency or need help with senior care involving your elderly loved one, Vista Living Senior Care is located in the Phoenix Arcadia area, between Biltmore and Scottsdale, and our team has helped seniors improve the quality of their life by making our purpose built 10 resident luxury assisted living homes something special.  We love what we do and it shows.

We urge you to consider Vista Living Senior Care for your family.  We know we have something special. Let us show you.  For more information please or to schedule a tour call Vista Living Senior Care at 602-456-1919, email info@VistaLiving.net or Visit Our Blog and subscribe.

Should Your Aging Parent Move In With You?

Should Your Aging Parent Move In With You?

Early in my career, before joining Vista Living Senior Care in Arcadia, I was fortunate to discover the importance of this question. For most children of aging parents this is the first question to ask yourself and will guide the process of finding the best options for their Senior Care.

Studies reveal that 25% of caregivers live with the elderly or disabled relative that he or she cares for. This arrangement can have many benefits, but there is a point in time when it can also begin to cause more expense, fatigue, heartache and stress, especially if your home has to go through a remodel for needed accommodations or modifications.

Take time to consider the following questions when deciding whether to be an in-home caregiver:

1. What kind of care will be needed?

It’s important to consider the person’s mental and physical condition, and any illnesses he or she may have, before you move him or her into your home.

However, moving parents out of their family home usually happens when there is some sort of health condition or crisis that acts as a catalyst for the transition. If this is the case, your family will be dealing with the person’s chronic illness, which will most likely get worse and eventually require round-the-clock care.

It’s important to think about the future senior care needs to determine whether a move into assisted living may be a better option.

2. Realistically, how much personal assistance and supervision can you provide?

Many families feel obligated, or even want, to bring their elderly loved ones into their home when their health declines. Many feel caring for an aging relative is a great way to give back some of the care, love and nurturing he or she may have given you.

But role-reversal can be challenging for everyone involved; not only for you, noone wants to be a burden and feel uncomfortable with you having to care for them.

Consider these other factors to determine whether the move is a good idea:
• Be realistic — You may consider speaking to your elderly relative’s doctor about his or her upcoming needs and determine whether you’re able to provide the level-of-assistance needed.
• Consider your schedule — Do you work? Do you have children? You need to consider whether you actually have time to watch someone who requires assistance. Do you have someone who can help you? There is no guilt in asking questions that you need to ask.
• Know your limits — If the person needs help with activities of daily living (ADLs), such as bathing and dressing, are you and your loved one comfortable with you performing these duties as caregiver? Do you feel your best, current option is hiring in-home aide or nurse until the need for more care makes it because necessary to have your loved one move into a senior care facility?

3. What’s your relationship like?

Do you get along well with your loved one or relative? You need to look at the history of your relationship and determine whether or not you can reside in the same house, let alone have you care for their needs.

If you can move past conflict easily and feel living together will only strengthen bonds without sacrificing your sanity in the process, the arrangement may work.

However, if you’ve never gotten along, putting yourself in close quarters probably isn’t a good idea, even if you feel obligated, you have to be realistic.

4. Can your home accommodate the person’s care needs today and in the future?

Often times, older adults with health problems can’t bathe or climb stairs easily unless grab bars are installed. Can you afford a renovation that may be involved, consider the following:

• Could you convert the living room or den into a bedroom easily?
• Is there a bathroom available on the floor the relative will be residing?
• Is the bathroom and hallway areas wheelchair accessible?
• What renovations will be needed, and is the cost worth it for both short-term and long-term health and senior care needs?
• Will everyone have a level of privacy they’re comfortable with?

5. How do your other family members really feel about the potential move-in?

You have to go with your gut when it comes to moving in your aging relative. Do you and your children feel excited about the potential move-in?

Does your spouse have a good relationship with the relative? How does he or she feel about the move-in? You want to make sure everyone is on-board with the decision and is prepared for potential sacrifices and responsibility. Consider meals, noise levels in the house and everyone’s preferences and styles. Can family members adapt to be compatible to accommodate multiple generations, in addition to possible care?

6. Will you have enough time to care for yourself?

If you’re working full time, you need to seriously consider whether you can handle the additional stress of having a dependent, older adult at home. Being a caregiver is hard work that many people don’t realize until they’re in the situation.

Many caregivers have lost or given up their jobs because they can’t juggle competing demands of work and taking care of an older adult. They are also prone to illness from exhaustion and stress if they’re not taking time for themselves. It’s important to replenish your own body, mind and spirit by having your own activities and time. You need to consider whether you can balance everything.

There are many support groups for caregivers, both in-person and online. It helps to realize you’re not alone in what you’re going through.

7. Your elderly loved one, what kind of social life will this arrangement offer them?

When a relative moves in with you, he or she may be leaving his or her own social network and friends. Not only that, it can be especially hard for some older people to adjust to a new environment, especially if they’re set in their ways.

Depression and loneliness from isolation could become an issue.

During your Senior Living career you have the pleasure of meeting many wonderful seniors and families, we still enjoy and recognize the reaction of a visiting family member or loved one commenting: she or he was in a hurry to have a meal with their friends.

Vista Living Senior Care believes a social life for seniors is very important and you’ll need to understand they can and may greatly benefit and thrive in an environment with friends their own age.

Families opt to move their aging loved one or relatives into assisted living — where there is 24-hour access to personal care, as well as nutrition and wellness services designed specifically for older adults. Seniors can enjoy social contact, security and support while still maintaining their independence.

If you’re still on the fence and struggling with the answer, then its down to 2 things: Care & Cost. Notice Care first, it’s only fair to ask, “Will someone else be able to provide the same level of care that I do?” Vista Living Senior Care Arcadia believes we can, and affordably.

We urge you to consider Vista Living Senior Care for your family. Please schedule a tour of one of our purpose built 10-resident Luxury Senior Care Communities in the Phoenix Arcadia area, between Scottsdale & Biltmore. We know we have something special. Let us show you.

For more information please call Vista Living Senior Care at our main line at (602) 456-1919 or email info@vistaliving.net.

Arcadia Assisted Living

Vista Living Senior Care Arcadia

Seniors Relying on Friends and Family are in Denial

Seniors Relying on Friends and Family are in Denial

Many of us have seen a senior who is struggling in their home. Some seniors silently believe they have a whole network of support from family and friends.

Daughters may call their mom once a day to inquire if their senior parent is okay OR no answer could mean they fell again and need help.
• Senior falls often lead to dangerous issues including fractured hips
• 911 calls
• skilled nursing care
• physically therapy
• 24/7 care

A son may set up medications in a pillbox for his senior parent, and then call two or three times a day to make sure his parent has taken them.
• This can be effective until the senior gets confused and says “What are these pills for? I don’t want to take them.”
• Not being there in person twice a day to make sure the senior properly ingests the pills can be an issue.

Kind neighbors may make an extra plate of dinner every night and take it to their senior neighbor.
• Neighbors get:
• Frustrated and burned out
• Worried and begin spending more time away from their own family
• This type of support does not last forever

Daughters may spend every other Saturday or Sunday cleaning mom’s house, grocery shopping, and setting up her senior parent to successfully survive for another two weeks.
• No matter how close or how far away the daughter lives, this type of help eventually turns into every Saturday or Sunday. If the daughter works full time, then what?

What is the answer to a senior struggling to manage in their home?
It starts with patience and persistence. As soon as the struggle becomes apparent it is time to start a discussion. You may focus on how the current home is an injury trap, or worse for the elderly, but sooner or later its time to have “The Talk”. Knowing what to expect may make it a bit easier to prepare.

There are five typical results in having “The Talk” with a senior:
1. Denial: “I am just fine living in my own home. I am not ready yet.”
2. Shutting down: “I don’t want to discuss this.”
3. Anger: “Why are you questioning my ability to be independent? Leave me alone.”
4. Confusion: “Don’t you want to come see me everyday? I don’t understand.”
5. Acceptance: “I understand that I have become a burden. Maybe it’s time to look at what my senior housing options could be. I am tired of being lonely. Will you help me look?”

Vista Living Senior Care is located in the Phoenix Arcadia area, between Scottsdale and Biltmore, and our team has helped seniors improve the quality of their life by making our purpose built, 10-resident luxury assisted living homes something special.

No one ever chooses memory care or skilled nursing, but those may be the only options for many seniors who waited too long and ended up in a health care crisis needing 24/7 care and can never return home. We are part of your team, a team working hard to provide a high level of senior care, at an affordable price, in an enriching environment.

We urge you to consider Vista Living Senior Care Arcadia for your family. Please schedule a tour of one of our purpose built 10-resident Luxury Senior Care Communities in the Phoenix Arcadia area. We know we have something special. Let us show you.

For more information please call Vista Living Senior Care at our main line at (602) 456-1919 or email info@vistaliving.net and subscribe.